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George Washington's Farewell Address
The Address of General Washington To The People of America On His Declining The Presidency Of The United States
by George Washington (09/17/1796)
George Washington's Farewell Address was written to .."The People of the United States" near the end of his second term as President of the United States. Originally published in David Claypoole's American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796 under the title "The Address of General Washington To The People of America On His Declining The Presidency Of The United States," the letter was almost immediately reprinted in newspapers across the country and later in a pamphlet form.
The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America
by Continental Congress (07/04/1776)
Albert Jay Nock, Forgotten Man of the Right
by Jeffrey A. Tucker (08/22/2002)
Here it is in one package, an illustration of the level of learning that had been lost with mass education, a picture of the way a true political dissident from our collectivist period thinks about the modern world, and a comprehensive argument for the very meaning of freedom and civility – all from a man who helped shape the Right's intellectual response to the triumph of the FDR's welfare-warfare State.
Article I
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article I of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section. The powers and limitations of Congress.
Article II
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article II of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section. Executive branch powers and limitations.
Article III
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article III of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section. The Function of the Courts.
Article IV
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article IV of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section.
Article V
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article V of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section.
Article VI
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Article VI of the US Consitution with explanations, history, and intent for each section.
Brief History of Money in America
US History of Money 1867-1960
Cases Using the Constitution
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
A list of the leading cases expounding the US Consitution with notes indicating the tenor of each case.
Democracy in America
by Alexis de Tocqueville (06/12/2000)
In 1831, the French political writer Alexis de Tocqueville visited the United States of America, a nation in which the citizenry had rejected such things as income taxation, welfare, Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, public schooling, drug wars, economic regulations, gun control, and immigration controls.
FDR - And The Raw Deal
"New Deal" was the new title chosen for the socialist agenda. Curtis Dall, FDR's son-in-law, doubted that FDR was the originator of this vast "recovery" effort.
Money in North American History
by Roy Davies (10/02/1998)
This essay is based on a book on monetary history by Glyn Davies which contains a considerable amount of material on the financial development of the United States.
Sorry, Mr. Franklin, “We’re All Democrats Now”
by Ron Paul (01/29/2003)
At the close of the Constitutional Conventional in 1787, Benjamin Franklin told an inquisitive citizen that the delegates to the Constitutional Convention gave the people “a Republic, if you can keep it.” We should apologize to Mr. Franklin. It is obvious that the Republic is gone, for we are wallowing in a pure democracy against which the Founders had strongly warned... (Speech before House of Representatives, Jan 29, 2003)
The 13th Amendment 'Disappears'
Titles of Nobility and Honor
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Twenty years after the passage of the Bill of Rights, in January, 1810, Senator Reed proposed another "title of nobility" Amendment. On April 27, 1810, the Senate voted to pass the 13th Amendment by a vote of 26 to 1; the House resolved in the affirmative 87 to 3; and the following resolve was sent to the States for ratification. After 12 of the required 13 states had ratified the Amendment, war broke out with England, and Washington was burned along with most of the federal governments records. Was it ratified or not?
The Bill of Rights
Articles I - X
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
The first Ten Articles of Amendment to the Constitution, collectively known as the "Bill of Rights", were proposed by the First Congress of the United States and submitted to the States September 25, 1789. Here are some explanations, history, and intent for each article and section.
The Civil War wasn't about Slavery
by Walter E. Williams (05/31/2000)
THE PROBLEMS THAT LED TO THE CIVIL WAR are the same problems today ---- big, intrusive government. The reason we don't face the specter of another Civil War is because today's Americans don't have yesteryear's spirit of liberty and constitutional respect, and political statesmanship is in short supply.
The Criminality of the State
by Albert Jay Nock (03/01/1939)
"Stripping the American State of the enormous power it has acquired is a full-time job for our citizens and a stirring one; and if they attend to it properly they will have no energy to spare for fighting communism, or for hating Hitler, or for worrying about South America or Spain, or for anything whatever, except what goes on right here in the United States."
The Missing 13th Amendment
by David Dodge - Researcher, Alfred Adask - Editor (08/01/1991)
Searching for evidence of government corruption in public records stored in the Belfast Library on the coast of Maine. By chance, they discovered the library's oldest authentic copy of the Constitution of the United States (printed in 1825). Both men were stunned to see this document included a 13th Amendment that no longer appears on current copies of the Constitution.
The Original 13th Amendment
Constitution for the United States of America
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
The Founders held an intense disdain and distrust of "Nobility" as a result of a long history, during Colonial times, of abuses and excesses against the Rights of Man and the established Common Law and Constitutions by the "Nobility", and therefore placed in the new Constitution two injunctions against acceptance of Titles of Nobility or Honor or emoluments from external sources. The Revolutionary War for Independence was primarily waged to eliminate these abuses and excesses of the "Nobility" and the "Monied Classes" from the life of the Nation, recognizing the Equality of all men.
The Pledge of Allegiance
A Short History
by Dr. John W. Baer (03/25/1992)
Francis Bellamy (1855 - 1931), a Baptist minister, wrote the original Pledge in August 1892. He was a Christian Socialist. In his Pledge, he is expressing the ideas of his first cousin, Edward Bellamy, author of the American socialist utopian novels, Looking Backward (1888) and Equality (1897).
The Story of the Buck Act
by Richard McDonald (02/20/2002)
When passing new statutes, the Federal government always does everything according to the principles of law. In order for the Federal Government to tax a Citizen of one of the several states, they had to create some sort of contractual nexus. This contractual nexus is the "Social Security Number".
These United States Of America ... Are Not a Democracy!
by James Kraft-Lorenz (04/18/2004)
The United States of America was never intended to be a democracy. The framers and ratifiers meant to impose the stable rule of law and not the rule of men, motivated, at the instant, by whim and passion. Democracy is the antithesis of the rule of law, for it is precisely the rule of the voters: that is, rule without limits, obtaining its power from 50%, plus 1, regardless of the established law. Under demos (populace) kratos (master), from the Greek, the mere whim of the majority, right, wrong or indifferent, becomes the law. A lynch mob is democratic within this definition.
War Is A Racket
by Major General Smedley Darlington Butler (01/01/1935)
The Anti-War Classic. "Much of War is a Racket was stock antiwar, anti-imperialist idiom, part of an American tradition dating back to the eighteenth century. Butler's particular contribution was his recantation, denouncing war on moral grounds after having been a warrior hero and spending most of his life as a military insider. The theme remained vigorously patriotic and nationalistic, decrying imperialism as a disgrace rooted in the greed of a privleged few." -- Hans Schmidt
War Is A Racket
by Major General Smedley Butler (01/01/1935)
That war is a racket has been told to us by many, but rarely by one of this stature. Though he died in 1940, the highly decorated General Butler deserves to be heralded for his timeless message. His riveting 1935 booklet War is a Racket merits inclusion as required reading for every high school student, and every member of our armed forces today. After reading the following excerpts from this amazingly revealing essay, please forward it to all your friends. By spreading the word far and wide, we can and will create a brighter future for ourselves and for our children.
What happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence?
by Matthew Spalding (06/17/2000)
They signed and they pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor.
Who Is Running America?
The Bankruptcy of America, the Corporate United States, and the New World Order
by The AWARE Group (02/01/2002)
Under the doctrine of Parens Patriae, "Government As Parent", as a result of the manipulated bankruptcy of the United States of America in 1930, ALL the assets of the American people, their person, and of our country itself are held by the Depository Trust Corporation, secured by UCC Commercial Liens, which are then monetized as "debt money" by the Federal Reserve. It may interest you to know that under the umbrella of the Depository Trust Corporation lies the CEDE Corporation, the Federal Reserve Corporation and the American Bar Association, the legal arm of the banking interests.
WILSON'S DESTINY, Part I
by Byron King (04/07/2004)
The Daily Reckoning PRESENTS: The 16th and 17th constitutional amendments... the Federal Reserve... would it surprise anyone to learn that these "tools" were instrumental in shaping the past century? Below, our friend Byron King takes a look at the man who first wielded them - the 28th President of the United States.
WILSON'S DESTINY, Part II
by Byron King (04/08/2004)
The Daily Reckoning PRESENTS: Were it not for Woodrow Wilson, what sort of world would we be living in today? Without Wilson's legacy of "federal credit, national debt, a large centralized government, and an imperious... moral ideology built and financed thereon," argues Byron King, would we recognize our own times?
"A Republic, If You Can Keep It"
by John F. McManus (11/06/2000)
The deliberations of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 were held in strict secrecy. Consequently, anxious citizens gathered outside Independence Hall when the proceedings ended in order to learn what had been produced behind closed doors. The answer was provided immediately. A Mrs. Powel of Philadelphia asked Benjamin Franklin, "Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?" With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, "A republic, if you can keep it." This exchange was recorded by Constitution signer James McHenry in a diary entry that was later reproduced in the 1906 American Historical Review.
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